Busy, busy …

A few weeks ago I was asked “what do you plan to do for Food Allergy Awareness (FAA) week?” My response was “nothing”. FAA Week has been going on for a couple years now, spearheaded by FARE.ORG. This year the week started May 10th and ends next weekend with the annual FARE.ORG conference.

I subscribe to a blog, and read a post about how he convinced his wife to take her blog and write a book.  Well, the next thing you know, I decided to try to do the same.  So here it is:

Living with Peanut Anaphylaxis or other Life Threatening Food Allergies [Kindle Edition]

Michael Sporer

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  • Length: 92 pages (estimated)
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Prime members can borrow this book and read it on their devices with Kindle Owners Lending Library.

Book Description

May 11, 2015

So, you just heard the dreaded news; your child has a Life Threatening Food Allergy (LTFA) and you are wondering just where to begin.

Prepare to be inundated with information and well intentioned advice from every angle. At any point in time parents are faced with too many choices, too many options. In the end there is only one path taken, one road traveled. This is a one way road and if you ever have a moment of self doubt there is only one acceptable answer:

“I made the best decision that I could with the information available to me at the time.”

Put this in your toolbox and reach for it often. Decide that you want to learn to make better decisions in the future and stop worrying about what almost happened. LTFA is a profound, terrifying experience, and not just for the parents. Mistakes will be made, accidents happen. Learn, live, keep moving forward. There is no alternative.

Work Life Balance

I was working hard and doing well the first 5 years at my last job. I had three beautiful daughters, and in my free time enjoyed working with my hands. I enjoyed building things. I enjoyed creating. I fixed things around the house and when I went to cocktail parties all the other men there would pull me aside and tell me that I’m making them look bad. But something was missing. I needed something for me. Something more social.

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